Tag Archives: education

[Nigeria] KSCE request upgrade to University

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The provost further said that the college had an International Computer Driver’s License (ICDL).

The Kwara State College of Education, Ilorin wants the state government to upgrade the school to University of Education to further produce qualified manpower for the nation.

Provost of the institution, Dr AbdulRaheem Yusuf, disclosed this in an interview with NoRM‘s known Media in his office in Ilorin on Friday.

Yusuf said that since the establishment of the institution in 1974, the school had produced good ambassadors representing the country in different areas of development.

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“If we can upgrade the College into University of Education, the issue of subvention can be a secondary thing, as more students will enroll into the institution in order to obtain their degree certificate,” he said.

The provost said the school management had made a proposal to the government on the upgrading and strongly believed that it would be approved.

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“We are moving forward in terms of development of our staff and that of the students.

“All our staff now are computer proficient and have undergone series of training, because there is need for upgrade,” the provost explained.

Yusuf said that the college had entered partnership with different organisations in terms of entrepreneurship, and the Entrepreneurship Grooming Institute (EGI) is establishing its centre in the institution.

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“The establishment of the centre means that the students will be taking more than a certificate, as they will take the NCE certificate and the entrepreneurship certificate

“We are much aware that the future may not depend only on the academic certificate, so we want to build students that will be job creators and not job seekers,” he said.

“Before anybody can be issued the license, that person must undergo training and pass the exam, and all our staff that participated in ICDL training passed

“An ICDL centre will soon be established in the institution, so that the college will be a centre for training,” he said.

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Yusuf added that all the college students were made to undergo Google Ambassador Training and the agent of Google recently visited the school to lecture them.

“We believe that with the ICDL and Google Ambassador certificate, the students will graduate as empowered citizens, with which they will not only be teachers, but a better person in the society,” he said.

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#Newsworthy

ASUU strike to end soon; read details

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The branch, however, called for payment of the allowance before the strike will be called off.

As results of the various congresses of the Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) trickle in, there are indications that the branches have accepted the Federal Government new offers.

But it is not yet uhuru as the congresses have given the Federal Government conditions to be met before the eight-month industrial action will be suspended by the union.

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Two days after the Minister of Labour and Employment, Dr. Chris Ngige, announced that the Federal Government’s negotiating team was still awaiting completion of Integrity Test on the Academic Staff Union of Universities’ (ASUU’s) University Transparency and Accountability Solution (UTAS), the Federal Government made an offer to the university lecturers. The latest offer seems to have moved the eight-month negotiation to a higher gear.

The Federal Government, at its recent meeting with ASUU, shifted grounds noticeably when it offered a total sum of N65 billion to the public university system to address some of its demands; revitalisation of universities and arrears of payment for earned allowances to lecturers. The government also said that salary arrears to striking lecturers would be reviewed for payment on an older platform, different from the government’s Integrated Payroll and Personnel Information System (IPPIS) and the UTAS. This has also reduced some of the troubling points in the industrial dispute. The new offer has been taken back to ASUU by the union’s president for consideration, a marked change from the stasis of the past months. The ball is now back in the court of ASUU.

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It is part of the public record in Nigeria that a team was appointed by the Administration of President Olusegun Obasanjo to look into the accounts of the rested Petroleum Trust Fund (PTF), which was established by the military Government led by General Sani Abacha to accelerate the delivery of public goods and improve the general wellbeing of Nigerians. It was chaired by Major-General Muhammadu Buhari (retd).

The investigation team, which was called Interim Management Team, was composed of the these personalities, Dr. Haroun Adamu (Chairman), Alhaji Abdu Abdurrahim, Barrister Achana Gaius Yaro, Arc Edward Eguavoen, Mr. T. Andrew Adegboro and Engr Baba Goni Machina. They did a thorough job of the assignment.

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The purpose of the probe or investigation of PTF, many Nigerians believed, rightly or wrongly, was to find even the tiniest hint of possible breach of public trust by its erthwhile Chairman, Muhammadu Buhari. That possible sign of a possible wrong doing could have been used to dent his good name in the eyes of Nigerians who strongly believed that he was honest, prudent and genuinely committed to deploying national resources entrusted to him for the benefit of all Nigerians.

ACADEMIC Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) branches are divided over whether to accept the Federal Government’s offer and call off their eight-month-old strike.

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The union will harmonise the positions of zones and branches at a meeting in Abuja today.

With some branches insisting that the government must meet all the demands before the strike is called off, the union may put the decision to a vote.

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The Ahmadu Bello University branch agreed with the government on the N40 billion Earned Academic Allowance (EAA).

Lecturers at the Federal University of Petroleum Resources (FUPRE), Delta State, said negotiations with the Federal Government must be concluded before the strike is called off.

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Ezekiel Agbalagba, chairman of ASUU at the university, said the congress on Wednesday accepted the EAA, but rejected the N25 billion for the revitalisation of the varsities.

According to him, the latest concession by the Federal Government is “an offer”, adding: “Let it land in our purse first.”

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#Newsworthy

ASUU: We didn’t suspend the Strike

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The news was started by a Twitter handle purportedly run by the association.

The Academic Staff Union of Universities has said that the news making the rounds that it has suspended its eight-month-old strike in Universities, is fake and should be disregarded.

Social media was agog with news on Saturday, November 21 that the academic union had suspended its strike action and will resume academic activities across the nation on Monday, November 23.

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A senior member of the association has however come out to debunk the news, stating that the association doesn’t have a Twitter handle.

According to the member, if the union wants to suspend the strike, it will be via a press conference and not via Twitter.

Recall with NoRM that last Friday November 20, the Federal government in its negotiation meeting with the academic union, accepted the demand of the lecturers to be exempted from the Integrated Payroll and Personnel Information System.

The Federal government also agreed to increase the Earned Allowances to university staff from N30 billion to N35b and the Revitalisation Fund from N20b to N25b.


#Newsworthy

Update: Hopes rising as Gov’t begins gradual agreement with ASUU

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These are some of the agreements reached at the resumed meeting between the leadership of ASUU and the federal government team on Friday.

The Federal Government on Friday offered leadership of the Academic Staff Union of Universities N65 billion for Earned Academic Allowance and revitalisation.

The government also agreed to pay the striking lecturers through the Government Integrated Financial Management Information System) until ASUU’s University Transparency and Accountability Solution (UTAS) was ready for usage.

At the end of the seven- hour meeting, Minister of Labour and Employment, Chris Ngige told reporters that the Accountant-General of the Federation ( AGF) has offered to release N40 billion or in the alternative, N35 billion to be shared by all the registered Trade Unions in the universities after providing necessary evidence of having earned the allowance.

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“The FG reiterated that her offer of N40 billion or 35 billion whichever is accepted by ASUU was for all the universities unions: ASUU had proposed that N40 billion be paid immediately for all unions ,” the Minister said.

Ngige said all vice-chancellors are to submit details of the EAA/EA to the National Universities Commission (NUC) on or before November 30.

Speaking on the issue of withheld salaries, Ngige said the Federal Ministry of Labour and Federal Ministry of Education will review the issue of “no work, no pay” as stipulated in Section 43 of the Trade Disputes Act Cap T8 laws of the federation of Nigeria, 2004 with a view to getting approval for the withheld salaries to be paid.


#Newsworthy..

Notice of Resumption, false – ASUU spills

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The chairman, however, said that a meeting between ASUU and the Federal Government on the lingering strike may hold on Friday.

Dr John Edor, the Chairman of Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU), University of Calabar (UniCal) branch, has debunked rumours that the union has called off its eight months old strike.

Edor debunked the rumour in a telephone interview with the NoRM‘s known Media in Calabar on Thursday.

He was reacting to a statement on Twitter purportedly credited to the union, calling off the strike.

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“As I talk to you now, ASUU does not have a Twitter account, so I wonder where that statement came from. As far as I am concerned, it is fake news, ” he said.

The union has been on an indefinite strike since April 4 and has held meetings many times with the Federal Government to resolve the impasse without success.


#Newsworthy…

ASUU: No Hope! – Lecturers alert parents, students

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ASUU accused President Muhammadu Buhari led government of not showing commitment in resolving the issues.

There is no hope in sight to call off the lingering strike action, the Staff Union of Universities, ASUU, informed parents and students.

ASUU had embarked on strike shortly before the Coronavirus lockdown, demanding the fulfilment of its 1999 agreement with the Federal Government.

The union said it will not end the strike until its demands on the Federal Government’s table are fully met, asking students and their parents to stop hoping that schools will resume soon

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The Zonal Coordinator of the Abuja zone of ASUU, Prof. Theophilus Lagi, made this known in a press conference at the University of Abuja campus, on Tuesday.

“[Our] members are relentlessly determined to continue with the ongoing strike until our demands are met,” the Coordinator said.

“Today, we wish to let Nigerians especially our students and parents know that there is no hope in sight to ending or suspending the ASUU strike that has lingered for several months as Government is yet to show serious commitment towards addressing our core demands”


#Newsworthy

Get ready to resume School – ASUU tells Students

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The Union expressed optimism that students would return to universities next week after its meeting with the federal government.

The Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) told students to prepare for resumption next week.

ASUU said this on its official Twitter page as the education body expressed hope of an agreement with the federal government.

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The tweet read: “ All Federal University students should prepare for resumption as we expect a positive outcome from ASUU on Wednesday.”

This is coming after the Minister of Labour and Employment, Chris Ngige, on Friday, expressed the hope that the agreement with the Union will be concluded next week.

Ngige lamented that ASUU was not considering the challenges their demands would create.


#Newsworthy…

COVID-19: Greece Gov’t shut down schools amid new virus surge.

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This lockdown started November 7 and is to last until November 30, although experts suggest it might last longer.

Greece announced on Saturday the closure of its primary schools, kindergartens and daycare centres amid a surge in coronavirus cases that has saturated the national health system.

“The Greek government decided the suspension of the functioning of schools until November 30,” said a statement from Health Minister Vassilis Kikilias.

“Closing elementary schools was the last thing we wanted to do. This is a measure of how serious the situation is,” he added.

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Secondary schools have already closed and all lessons have taken place remotely since Monday.

Most European countries have kept schools open during the second wave of cases that have hit the continent since September, unlike in March and April when they were shuttered during the first lockdowns.

The World Health Organisation recommends that schools only be shut as a last resort.

Since late October, the daily number of deaths in Greece has quadrupled with 50 deaths reported some days, while the number of infections has doubled to around 3,000 cases daily.

Out of the 1,143 total, intensive care unit beds nationwide on Friday 830 were occupied.

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“The coming weeks will be extremely critical”, Greek Prime Minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis said Thursday in the Greek Parliament where he was briefing MPs for the second lockdown since March.

Since Friday night a curfew from 9 pm to 5am has been imposed all over Greece.

The country with a population of 10.9 million people has experienced 997 deaths and 69,675 contaminations since the beginning of the pandemic in late February, most of them in the last four months.

The most hard-hit area is the northern city of Thessaloniki, the second-largest city in Greece.

“The health system is in the red,” Health Minister Kikilias has warned.


#Newsworthy…

Update: NECO fixes new exam day as EndSARs protest dissolves.

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NECO spokesperson, Azeez Sani, made the announcement on Monday.

The National Examinations Council (NECO), on Monday, announced that 2020 Senior School Certificate Examination (SSCE) in all states and Abuja, will resume on November 9.

Recall with Noble Reporters Media that the exam was suspended due to the nationwide End SARS protest.

Speaking on Monday Sani said, “Following the return of normalcy in the states and FCT, the examinations will now continue with a new Time-Table from Monday 9th November, 2020 to Saturday 28th November, 2020.”

He added that the exam body will make the new schedule available to the general public, schools and candidates from November 4.


#Newsworthy

UNILAG Crisis: Babalakin resign as Pro-Chancellor.

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The University of Lagos Pro-Chancellor Wale Babalakin (SAN), has resigned following an alleged disagreement with the Nigerian Government on the visitation panel sent to the university.

“I would like to thank the President of the Federal of Nigeria, President Muhammadu Buhari for giving me the opportunity to serve as the Pro-Chancellor of the University of Lagos (the “University”) from May 2017 till date,” Babalakin said in his resignation letter addressed to minister for education Adamu Ada

“I am also grateful that I was considered fit to be the Chairman of the Federal Government Negotiation Team on the Agreement reached with university unions in 2009, from 6th January 2017 till date. I equally want to thank you sir, for your role in recommending me to the President.”


#Newsworthy…

As school resumes: Sept. 14 resumption, only for final year students – Lagos Gov. [Nigeria]

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The Lagos state government has announced that only final-year students will be resuming when tertiary institutions reopen next Monday in the state.

Tokunbo Wahab, Special Adviser on Education to Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu, stated this.

Wahab said, “Basically, we are at a point where scientifically we’ve been proven to have flattened the curve. And it invariably means that we are not as exposed as we used to be some five, four, three months back.

So, consequently, we have to find a way to bring our lives back to normal. And in doing that, education is very critical to whatever we are going to do.

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“In the past few weeks, we’ve been putting in place measures and facilities that will enable our children come back to school.

“Even at that, what we seek to do from next week is to start a phased reopening of our tertiary institutions.

“On the 14th we have announced that our tertiary institutions are going to open to our students for the first time after six months.”

Wahab said the students have been having their lectures online all along and “they are going to come on campus to have their revision one-on-one and then they can now have their exams and their projects.”

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“For our tertiary (institutions) from on the 14th, we are going to start with the final-year students across our tertiary institutions. With those final-year students, we are sure that they are older, they are more mature, and they are going to meet up with the protocol as put in place by the institutions based on the regulations of the NCDC (Nigeria Centre for Disease Control).

“After we have phased them out, maybe after their exams, then, those in the penultimate year will come on campus. So, we are not going to put all our students on campus at the same time.

“For our secondary, from on the 21st, they are also going to have a phased resumption.” Wahab concluded.

Recall with Noble Reporters Media that Schools in the country had been shut in March as part of measures to curb the spread of the deadly covid-19 disease.


#Newsworthy…

As school resumes: Teacher in Senegal crowdfunds school rebuild

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Schoolteacher Mamadou Junior Diakhaté is on a mission to rebuild a school in Senegal in time for students to pass their exams to enter high school.

The teacher nicknamed “Junior” used his social media accounts to crowdfund the rebuild and has raised about 3,000 euros.

The institution was shut due to the coronavirus pandemic in March and only pupils who were sitting the tests could partially return in June, coinciding with the heavy rain period.

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“This school must host students on September 14th for exams and look at the state of the classrooms. So we came to give a hand,” said Diakhaté.

“With the money we buy equipment, then we publish on social media the invoices, everything the money was use for. We show before and after photos and regular updates. So people trust us because they see that their donation is used for something and not used for other purposes .”-

Thanks to his popular Twitter page, he has raised about 3,000 euros. But he says one headteacher accused him of playing politics.

But many other schools in the country are in the same state. He’s received about 40 requests from schools in similar conditions.


#Newsworthy…

As school resumes: Public schools suffer reduction as kids move to Private.

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By the time the school year ended this spring, Clara Obermeier knew remote learning was not a good option for her two children.

Her 13-year-old daughter had grown withdrawn after going months without seeing her friends. Her 11-year-old son had struggled academically, and due to a Zoom glitch, was frequently blocked from the virtual breakout rooms where the rest of his classmates were assigned to work in small groups. And neither Obermeier, an engineer, nor her husband, an active-duty officer in the U.S. Coast Guard, have jobs that will allow them to work from home full-time this fall.

“I waited and waited to figure out what the plan was from the school system,” Obermeier says. On July 21, Montgomery County Public Schools in Maryland announced that the district would offer virtual-only instruction at least through January. “At that point, we were like, OK, this is definitely not going to work out for us,” she says.

So Obermeier pulled her children from the public school district and enrolled them in St. Bartholomew School, a private Catholic school in Bethesda, Md., that charges $13,600 in tuition and is planning to bring all students back to campus by Sept. 21 after a phased reopening beginning Sept. 8.

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Such decisions are playing out across the country ahead of the first day of school, as districts announce reopening plans and individual families craft ad-hoc solutions in preparation for what will be, at best, an unusual school schedule. But the solutions available to wealthier families — from private schools to pricey learning pods — have highlighted the ways the pandemic is exacerbating educational inequities. While many students struggled through the spring to access the most basic remote learning opportunities, often without home Internet service and computers, others had the benefit of private tutors or all-day virtual instruction provided by their schools.

“Schools are highly unequal. But the ability of families to provide education is even more unequal,” says Richard Kahlenberg, director of K-12 equity at The Century Foundation, a progressive think tank.

That’s a fact acknowledged even by parents who can afford private tutoring or private school for their children, and who struggle with the question of how to help their own kids without exacerbating educational inequity. Mayssoun Bydon, the managing partner at the Institute for Higher Learning, which offers test prep and admissions consulting, expects the coming school year to reveal an educational divide “like we’ve never seen before.” And yet, Bydon hired a private tutor for her own son, who attends a private school. “I felt like I couldn’t afford to just fail him personally,” she says.

Fall reopening plans vary widely among schools. About half of the country’s public school districts are planning on full in-person instruction, but 41% of the highest-poverty districts are beginning the year with entirely remote learning, according to an analysis by the Center on Reinventing Public Education. That means many of the students who are most likely to need the academic, social and emotional support of in-person instruction won’t receive it.

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As of late July, 40% of private schools were planning on full in-person reopening, 19% were preparing for entirely virtual instruction, and 41% were offering a mix of both, according to a survey by the National Association of Independent Schools, which represents 1,600 private schools across the U.S.

Many of the private schools that are planning to bring students back for in-person learning have the advantage of small class sizes and large outdoor spaces that make social distancing easier, in addition to endowments and donations that have made it possible to upgrade air filtration systems, revamp nurses’ offices, set up tented classrooms outside, secure COVID-19 testing and hire more staff.

“Schools are highly unequal. But the ability of families to provide education is even more unequal.”

In Brooklyn, Poly Prep Country Day School— a 166-year-old private school where families pay as much as $53,000 in tuition and fees — will reopen for in-person learning on Sept. 8, setting up 70 “socially distanced tents” across its 25-acre campus. Younger students will be divided into pods that will be kept separate from one another, and the average lower-school class size has shrunk to 12 students. The school will require a negative COVID-19 test for everyone returning to school, and one family’s anonymous donation will cover testing costs for faculty.

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At Boston Trinity Academy, a pop-up on the school’s website asks visitors for patience “as we are experiencing an unusually high number of applications.” Compared to a typical summer, the small Christian school saw a 40% increase in applications this summer, mostly from public school families. But social distancing requirements led the school to cap some classes at nine or 12 students, limiting how many new students they can accept. Admissions Director Bisi Oloko said the school’s seventh grade was full, but two students transferring there from other schools were willing to repeat sixth grade to get a spot at Boston Trinity. Boston Public Schools, a district that serves more than 53,000 students across 125 schools, will begin the year remotely until Oct. 1, when the district plans to begin a hybrid model. Boston Trinity Academy, which enrolls about 230 students at a tuition rate of $20,700, will begin classes in person on Sept. 8, with about 10% of students choosing a virtual option instead.

“There are disgruntled parents out there,” says Headmaster Frank Guerra. “There are people who felt like their school systems let them down, and their kids were almost like on a three-month vacation, and that’s devastating.”

That’s why, for parents who can afford it, private schools with unique reopening plans have become an attractive solution.

Roxana Reid, founder of the New York City educational consulting firm Smart City Kids Inc, saw a “ridiculous uptick” in business beginning in June, as she heard from families looking to transfer from public to private schools. Bydon, of the Institute for Higher Learning, has seen a 38% increase in her business since March as parents seek private tutors or ask the company to develop personal curricula for their children.

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The experience has left Bydon worried about the growing divide between students at elite private schools and those at underfunded public schools.

“We’re going to end up with a real educational divide between the haves and the have-nots and without a way to reverse it,” Bydon says. “Who’s going to fail are the kids who don’t have the money.”

But Bydon, who lives in New York City, can also relate to her clients who have sought out expensive help for their kids. When schools shut down in March, her son was in kindergarten and had just been learning to read, so she hired a private tutor to make sure he didn’t fall behind. “Nobody imagined that there was going to be another full academic year of this,” she says.

In Vienna, Va., Colleen Ganjian withdrew her daughter from Fairfax County Public Schools after the district announced it would begin the school year remotely, enrolling her in a private Catholic school instead.

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“I just want her to have consistency,” says Ganjian, an educational consultant and founder of DC College Counseling. “The bottom line is I am so busy. I own a business, and I can’t be that person. I can’t provide her with the consistency that she needs. That’s kind of why I feel I needed to look for an alternative.”

On Aug. 26, she dropped her daughter off at her new school “bright and early” for the first day of third grade, in person and wearing a mask. “I think she was excited to just get out of the house,” Ganjian says.

Exacerbating inequity
The role of private schools has become a hot button issue within the contentious debate over whether it’s safe to send kids back to class. President Donald Trump has called on public schools to fully reopen in person, and if they don’t, he said school funding “should follow students so parents can send their child to the private, charter, religious or home school of their choice.” Education Secretary Betsy DeVos issued a rule for more coronavirus relief funding to be directed to private schools, prompting lawsuits from states and school districts in response.

On July 31, Montgomery County Health Officer Dr. Travis Gayles issued an order directing all non-public schools to remain closed for in-person instruction until at least Oct. 1, saying “at this point the data does not suggest that in-person instruction is safe for students or teachers.” That prompted backlash from private school parents. Many of them signed petitions, arguing that private and parochial schools should be allowed to develop plans in line with CDC and state guidance “without arbitrary and capricious interference from county officials.”

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Obermeier was one of several parents who sued the county to reverse Gayles’s decision. The lawsuit argued that private schools had spent time and “millions of dollars” to ensure safe environments for children and staff, and it accused Gayles of being driven more by concerns over equity than public health.

“It appears to be a political response, an answer to complaints by some public school parents about ‘why their schools are closed and private schools are not,’” the lawsuit stated.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, issued an executive order overruling the county’s directive, giving school districts and private schools across the state the authority to decide when and how to reopen. (An attorney representing the parents said their lawsuit has not been dismissed but that they’re focusing on “promoting collaboration between Montgomery County and nonpublic schools.”) While all public school districts in Maryland are beginning the year virtually, Hogan encouraged schools to reopen in person, announcing on Aug. 27 that all districts had met state benchmarks to offer some in-person instruction.

In California, Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, announced that any school—public or private— in a county on the state’s coronavirus watchlist cannot reopen in-person. But schools can apply for waivers to reopen early for kindergarten through sixth grade. Informal surveys by the California Association of Independent Schools (CAIS) found that “most CAIS schools that include grades K-6 are keen to re-open on campus” and many have applied for waivers. The association said it believes that “on-campus schooling is better for kids than distance learning, provided it can be done safely.”

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It’s not yet clear whether families are withdrawing from public schools in significant numbers. A survey by the National Association of Independent Schools conducted in August found that 51% of private schools either maintained or grew enrollment for the coming school year, and 58% reported a “larger than average” number of admission inquiries from families in other types of schools — a category that could include traditional public schools, charter schools and parochial schools. Some private schools have also faced financial challenges during the pandemic, reporting a drop in international student enrollment and fewer fundraising opportunities. More than 100 private schools — mostly private Catholic schools — have permanently closed this year because of pandemic-related challenges, according to the libertarian Cato Institute.

Education experts warn that moving children from public to private schools would have a negative effect on public schools in the long run.

“I can’t say that I fault individual parents for doing what they think is best for their own kids. But the secession of upper middle class families from public school to private school is very bad for the country and for educational equality,” Kahlenberg says.

And the very thing that is drawing some parents to private schools is also cause for concern among private school teachers. While teachers’ unions have opposed plans for in-person learning, threatening to strike if teachers and other school staff aren’t protected, most private school teachers are not unionized and have less leverage to object to their schools’ plans.

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As of Aug. 30, nearly 3,000 teachers and other employees at more than 350 private schools had signed two anonymous petitions, calling for their schools to pursue virtual-only instruction to protect students’ and educators’ health. In interviews with Media (known to Noble Reporters Media), several private school teachers said they are worried about the virus spreading when in-person classes begin but fear retaliation for raising concerns about school plans.

“There may be fears around enrollment numbers dropping that are driving people to be back on campus, fears around losing families who are paying pretty enormous tuitions,” said a teacher who organized one of the petitions and who requested anonymity for fear of being fired. “At schools that can offer a robust, successful remote program, it feels irresponsible not to take that route. Our hearts go out to underfunded public schools that do not have the luxury of making this choice that many private schools can make.”

That’s something that Erica Turner has been thinking about a lot, as both a parent and an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she studies racism and inequity in educational policy. She recently published a guide for Equity in Pandemic Schooling, intended to be a resource for communities and families as they make plans for the coming school year.

When families abandon public schools and turn to private options, Turner wrote, “they undermine the schools upon which less privileged families depend,” making it harder for other students, especially low-income children of color, to get good educations. The guide encourages parents to advocate for more school funding from Congress, demand the resources to make remote learning accessible for all students—including those who are homeless or have disabilities—and keep their own children enrolled in public schools.

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Obermeier, the mother in Maryland, says the issue of equity weighed heavily on her when she decided to pull her kids from public school. “It was hard to think that, ‘OK I can solve it for myself,” while many others in the district would be left without a solution, she says.

As an immigrant from Ecuador, she also worries that the challenges of this school year will disproportionately affect low-income families or immigrants who don’t speak English and who can’t easily help their children learn at home. “To me, the most equitable thing to have done was to open the schools and give priority to precisely the kids who need it,” she says.

But as more school districts fail to reopen, families will continue to find individual, if inequitable, solutions.

“In the end, we just have to make sure we have our priorities straight,” Obermeier says, “and for us right now, it’s stability and the least amount of disruption for our kids.”


#Newsworthy…

As school resumes: Universities in Senegal reopening

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Senegal’s universities began reopening their doors on Tuesday after being closed for five months due to the coronavirus pandemic.

At the county’s largest university, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, the 78,000 students were split into three groups.

Some will attend classes in person on rotation with others who will do online classes.

Senegal has eight universities but other institutions will open later in the week.

They must now adhere to COVID-19 safety rules, which include social distancing measures.

There have been over 13,500 coronavirus cases in the country with more than 250 deaths, according to data from The World Health Organization.


#Newsworthy…

Katsina State Transportation University To Be Ready By Sept. 2021 – FG

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The Federal Government on Saturday said the Transportation University being constructed in Daura, Katsina State, will be ready by September 2021.

Minister of Transportation, Rotimi Amaechi, made the disclosure in Katsina during an inspection of the project.

The $50m project is a corporate social responsibility project of CCECC, the Chinese company handling the nation’s rail project.

Mr Amaechi explained that the Chinese company just got approval from the Katsina State Government as proper construction commences next month.

The Minister added that the CCECC will provide the manpower and technical skills for five years before the federal government will be able to take over.

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The groundbreaking ceremony of the university was done by President Muhammadu Buhari in December 2019, but the coronavirus pandemic stalled efforts on the project.

FILE: President Muhammadu Buhari (centre) was part of the groundbreaking ceremony of the University in December 2019.

A Courtesy Call
Mr Amaechi visited Katsina on Saturday with a team of consultants to pay a courtesy call to Governor Aminu Masari.

The Minister thanked the Governor for his support in making the project see the light of day.

In his response, Governor Masari thanked the Federal Government for the decision to establish the Transport University in Daura.

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According to the governor, opportunities that come with education are limitless.

He assured the Minister of his administration’s commitment to making sure that the State remains hospitable to the project’s success.

Located in Sandamu Local Government Area in Daura Emirate, the specialised university will help the country build a retinue of competent railway engineers who can maintain and improve on the country’s new rail infrastructure, Mr Amaechi has said.

Amaechi also noted that about 150 Nigerians are presently studying in China through University scholarships paid for by CCECC


#Newsworthy…

As school resumes: Sanwo olu announces resumption dates for Lagos schools

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– 6:08 PM –

After months of being shut down, schools in Lagos are set to re-open in September, Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu revealed on Saturday.

The Governor, in a regular briefing on the state’s COVID-19 status, said tertiary institutions in the state will re-open from September 14.

Primary and secondary schools are also tentatively scheduled to re-open from September 21.

“This decision is not cast in stone and is subject to review of our ongoing modelling and what procedure comes out from the Ministry of Health,” Sanwo-Olu said.

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– 6:12 PM – 

The Governor explained that the decision was based on indications that the pandemic has peaked in the state, as the number of new cases continues to steadily decline.

Sanwo-Olu reiterated that restaurants are now permitted to open for in-dining services in the state, although they must continue to ensure spaces are only filled up to 50 percent capacity at all times.

On the re-opening of event centres, bars, night clubs, beaches, cinemas, the Governor said a review will be done in September to decide whether to allow a re-opening of such public spaces.

Responding to a question on whether the Federal Government’s 10 pm curfew still holds in Lagos, Sanwo-Olu replied in the affirmative.

“These are challenging times for all of us,” he said.

#Newsworthy…