Tag Archives: Eid Kabir

5 die in Somalia blast during Eid Celebration


At least five people were killed and more than 20 injured Sunday in Somalia in a blast during festivities to mark the Eid al-Fitr festival.

“The initial information we have received indicates the dead bodies of five people were collected from the scene of the blast and more than twenty others have been wounded,” police officer Mohamed Muktar told AFP by phone from Baidoa, about 250 kilometres (150 miles) west of the capital Mogadishu.

The cause of the explosion was unclear. “The number of wounded people is over 20 including women and children, so that death toll could increase because some of these people are seriously wounded,” Muktar added. Witness Mohamud Ibrahim said the crowd had been dancing and singing when the blast occurred. “I’m not an expert but I think there was a roadside bomb involved, the blast was huge and it caused casualties more than a grenade may cause,” he said, also speaking by phone. Another witness, Abdi Hassan, said people had gathered at the spot on both Saturday and Sunday to enjoy the Eid festivities, especially dancing. “How can someone shed the blood of innocent civilians when they have been enjoying their Eid festival. “These perpetrators whoever they are have turned their happiness into sadness,” Hassan said. The Muslim world is celebrating the Eid al-Fitr festival which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan. Al-Shabaab, an Al-Qaeda affiliate, was driven out of Mogadishu in 2011 and lost most of its strongholds, but still controls vast swathes of the countryside.

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At least five people were killed and more than 20 injured Sunday in Somalia in a blast during festivities to mark the Eid al-Fitr festival.

“The initial information we have received indicates the dead bodies of five people were collected from the scene of the blast and more than twenty others have been wounded,” police officer Mohamed Muktar told AFP by phone from Baidoa, about 250 kilometres (150 miles) west of the capital Mogadishu.

The cause of the explosion was unclear.

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“The number of wounded people is over 20 including women and children, so that death toll could increase because some of these people are seriously wounded,” Muktar added.

Witness Mohamud Ibrahim said the crowd had been dancing and singing when the blast occurred.

“I’m not an expert but I think there was a roadside bomb involved, the blast was huge and it caused casualties more than a grenade may cause,” he said, also speaking by phone.

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Another witness, Abdi Hassan, said people had gathered at the spot on both Saturday and Sunday to enjoy the Eid festivities, especially dancing.

“How can someone shed the blood of innocent civilians when they have been enjoying their Eid festival.

“These perpetrators whoever they are have turned their happiness into sadness,” Hassan said.

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The Muslim world is celebrating the Eid al-Fitr festival which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan.

Al-Shabaab, an Al-Qaeda affiliate, was driven out of Mogadishu in 2011 and lost most of its strongholds, but still controls vast swathes of the countryside.

Its militants have vowed to overthrow the internationally-backed government in Mogadishu and still carry out attacks including suicide bombings against government and international targets.

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In 2013 and 2016 the group launched deadly attacks on beachfront restaurants in Mogadishu.

They have vowed to overthrow the internationally-backed government in Mogadishu and still carry out attacks including suicide bombings against government and international targets. In 2013 and 2016 the group launched deadly attacks on beachfront restaurants in Mogadishu.


#Newsworthy…

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Despite COVID-19 threat, Muslims celebrate Eid Worldwide.


Muslims around the world began marking a sombre Eidul Fitr Sunday, many under coronavirus lockdown, but lax restrictions offer respite to worshippers in some countries despite fears of skyrocketing infections.

The festival, one of the most important in the Muslim calendar marking the end of the holy month of Ramazan, is traditionally celebrated with mosque prayers, family feasts and shopping for new clothes, gifts and sweet treats.

But this year, the celebration is overshadowed by the fast-spreading respiratory disease, with many countries tightening lockdown restrictions after a partial easing during Ramadan led to a sharp spike in infections.

Further dampening the festive spirit, multiple countries — from Saudi Arabia to Egypt, Turkey and Syria — have banned mass prayer gatherings, a festival highlight, to limit the spread of the disease.

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Saudi Arabia, home to Islam’s holiest sites, began a five-day, round-the-clock curfew from Saturday after infections more than quadrupled since the start of Ramadan to around 68,000 –- the highest in the Gulf.

Eid prayers will be held at the two holy mosques in the cities of Makkah and Madinah “without worshippers”, authorities said on Saturday, citing a royal decree.

Makkah’s Grand Mosque has been almost devoid of worshippers since March, with a stunning emptiness enveloping the sacred Kaaba.

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Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa mosque, Islam’s third holiest site, will reopen to worshippers only after Eid, its governing body said.

In Lebanon, the highest Sunni religious authority has announced the reopening of mosques only for Friday prayers. Worshippers, however, will be subject to temperature checks and sanitary controls before they enter.

– Fears of ‘new peak’ –

Meanwhile, Muslims across Asia — from Indonesia to Pakistan, Malaysia and Afghanistan — thronged markets for pre-festival shopping, flouting coronavirus guidelines and sometimes even police attempts to disperse large crowds.

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“For over two months my children were homebound,” said Ishrat Jahan, a mother of four, at a bustling market in the Pakistani city of Rawalpindi.

“This feast is for the kids, and if they can’t celebrate it with new garments, there is no point in us working so hard throughout the year.”

In Indonesia –- the world’s most populous Muslim nation — people are turning to smugglers and fake travel documents to get around bans on the annual end-of-Ramadan travel that could send infections soaring. 

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More than 3,500 Tunisians who travelled home just ahead of the holiday will have to spend it away from their families, forced to quarantine for two weeks in hotels after arriving from abroad.

Atef Maherzi, a doctor repatriated Tuesday from Saudi Arabia, said she would be catching up with family over Skype, foregoing her usual role of host.

“Usually, I’m the mistress of the house, but this time, my husband will receive the guests alone.”

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The COVID-19 death tolls across the Middle East and Asia have been lower than in Europe and the United States, but numbers are rising steadily, sparking fears the virus may overwhelm often underfunded healthcare systems.

Iran, which has experienced the Middle East’s deadliest outbreak, has called on its citizens to avoid travel during Eid as it battles to control infection rates.

Iran shut schools and places of worship and banned inter-city travel for the Persian New Year holidays in March, but the restrictions were recently eased.

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Health Minister Saeed Namaki said that the country was focusing hard on avoiding “new peaks of the disease” caused by people “not respecting health regulations”.

The exact date of Eid has yet to be set in the Shiite-majority country, but will likely be Monday, in line with the Shiite community’s celebrations in Iraq, as announced by top cleric Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani.

Sunnis in Iraq will mark the start of the festival on Sunday.

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– ‘Comedy night’ –

The neighbouring United Arab Emirates has tightened its lockdown, with the night-time curfew starting at 8:00 pm (1600 GMT) instead of 10:00 pm during Ramadan. 

But that has not stopped some families from planning getaways to luxury beachfront hotels in Ajman or Ras Al-Khaimah emirates.

However, Muslims in many countries are set for frugal celebrations amid growing financial distress.

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The twin shocks of coronavirus restrictions and falling oil prices have plunged the region into the worst economic crisis in decades.

The coronavirus restrictions have hit businesses hard, including retailers who would normally be preparing for the festive rush, as Muslims save their money for masks, gloves and other COVID-19 protective gear.

In the Syrian capital Damascus, Eid shoppers rummaged through flea markets for clothes at bargain prices as the war-ravaged and sanctions-hit country grapples with a much more entrenched economic crisis.

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“The flea market is the only place I can buy something new to wear for the Eid holidays,” 28-year-old Sham Alloush told AFP.

“Had it not been for this place, I wouldn’t have been able to buy new clothes at all.”

But promising some laughs in these dire times, 40 Muslim comedians from across the world will host a virtual show on Sunday called “The Socially Distant Eid Comedy Night”.

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“This Ramadan has been particularly difficult for communities around the world,” said Muddassar Ahmed, head of the Concordia Forum, the organiser of the event.

“We’re proud to be pulling together some of the brightest Muslim comedic talent to entertain those celebrating the Eid festival at home, people looking to learn a little bit about Muslim culture, or really anyone in need of a good laugh.”


#Newsworthy..

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PDP send Eid-el fitr message to Nigerians.


The Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) on Saturday urged Nigerians, particularly leaders at all levels, not to lose sight of the essence of the Eid-el Fitr and the eternal lessons of Ramadan.

The party in a statement issued by its National Publicity Secretary, Mr Kola Ologbondiyan, in Abuja urged Nigerians to bring the lessons to bear by living in truth, selflessness, tolerance, forbearance, honesty, and transparency in all their dealings.

Ologbondiyan felicitated with Nigerians, particularly the Muslim community, on this year’s Eid-el Fitr celebrations, urging all compatriots to exhibit the virtues imbibed during the Ramadan fast in all aspects of life.

He noted that the fervent prayers and the successful completion of the Ramadan fast point to the determination by the people in their ardent trust in God to overcome the vicissitudes of life both as individuals and as a nation, particularly as the nation battle the COVID-19 pandemic.

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“The PDP stressed that leaders must, therefore, bear in mind that the positions they occupy were bestowed by the Almighty Allah for the good of the people and that they will surely give an account of their actions, particularly towards the down-trodden, the oppressed and the voiceless.

“Furthermore, our party beckons on all Nigerians to jettison all divisive tendencies that stoke acts of violence, and rekindle the spirit of love, forgiveness, reconciliation, and unity needed to pull our nation out of the woods.

The PDP, according to Ologbondiyan, also urged all citizens to use the occasion to reach out and share with one another, especially the less privileged, the sick, orphans, widows and the aged at this critical time.

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“The party also called on Nigerians not to drop their guards during this festive period but remain alert in observing all health safety and protection directives in the collective effort to check the spread of COVID-19 pandemic, which would soon be a thing of the past in our nation.

“The PDP prayed for the nation and wished Nigerians happy Eid-el Fitr celebrations,” he said.


#Newsworthy…

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Breaking: Michigan Muslims find new way to celebrate Eid.


Eid al-Fitr in the US state of Michigan this year is going to be very different, said Mahmoud Al-Hadidi, a physician and chairman of the Michigan Muslim Community Council.

There will be no mass prayers in the mosques, no communal breakfasts, no carnival and no evening parties. Even family gatherings will be limited.

“Usually we have a huge party at my house with 400 to 500 people,” Al-Hadidi said.

“I’m not gonna be doing that this year,” Al-Hadidi said. “I’m going to be with my immediate family, and we’re staying at home.”

But the curbs on mass social gatherings put in place to contain the spread of the coronavirus, expected to last through at least May 28, have not dampened the holiday spirit. And residents of southeast Michigan, home to one of the largest Muslim communities in the United States, say they have found innovative ways to welcome the three-day holiday marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, while adhering to social-distancing measures.

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“We are determined to celebrate and be happy despite all the circumstances, we will adapt,” Al-Hadidi added.

Thousands are expected to tune in on Sunday morning for a live Eid sermon that will be aired on local television and streamed on social media. Later in the day, cars will be able to line up outside several mosques to enjoy live music and to receive gift bags for children, in this year’s first-ever drive-thru Eid event.

Like most Muslims around the world, those of southeast Michigan, a community of over 250,000, traditionally celebrate Eid by visiting friends and relatives in their homes or attending large gatherings where people eat and socialise together.

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“Normally we go to the mosque for prayer and breakfast, and at night we go out for dinner,” Lama Samman Nasry said, “we spend most of the day out of the house.”

Samman Nasry – a resident of the Detroit suburb Franklin who works as a manager at an urgent care clinic and is the mother of four children – said she will be one of dozens who will be volunteering to hand out presents and food, hoping to help spread some joy.

“It’s going to be a quieter celebration,” she said. “It will be a different kind of celebration, definitely.”

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Michigan has been one of the hardest-hit states during the coronavirus pandemic, with over 53,000 cases of COVID-19 and over 5,000 deaths – the fourth-highest death toll in the country, according to Johns Hopkins University statistics.

The state also imposed one of the strictest stay-at-home orders, which prompted small groups of protesters, some armed, to demonstrate at the state capitol.

On Thursday, Michigan’s governor Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced steps to reopen the state’s economy and presented timelines for the resumption of some businesses and allowing some social gatherings.

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“We’ve taken significant steps forward to re-engage our economy safely and responsibly over the past few weeks. Now we are going to take some time to ensure that these new measures are working,” Whitmer said during Thursday’s news briefing.

On Friday, US President Donald Trump said that he has deemed houses of worship as “essential” and called on governors across the country to allow them to reopen this weekend despite the threat of spreading the coronavirus.

“These are places that hold our society together and keep our people united,” he said at a news conference at the White House.

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“The people are demanding to go to church and synagogue, go to their mosque,” he said.

Trump said that if governors do not abide by his request, he will “override” them. It remains unclear what authority he has to do so, and how governors – including Michigan’s – will respond.

Meanwhile, Firas Bazerbashi, a physician, says most residents in Michigan are fully aware of the health risks and will forego the customary community celebrations. He added that after weeks of quarantine, people have learned to replace family visits with phone calls and Zoom sessions, despite a renewed need to be physically close to family.

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“It will be remarkably different,” Bazerbashi said. “It’s really hard to be isolated from family and friends and being disconnected from the community.”

“We are mentally prepared to have a COVID Eid, but it is still very challenging,” he said.


#Newsworthy…

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Eid Celebration happening in Pakistan on Sunday?


Mufti Shahabuddin Popalzai of Peshawar’s Qasim Ali Khan mosque Friday announced that Shawal moon was not sighted in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and they will celebrate Eidul Fitr on Sunday (May 25).

Mufti Popalzai has a unique and odd precedent to dent the national unity to celebrate the religious festivals on the same day. For the last few years, Mufti Popalzai has been coming up with contradictory statements to official announcements.

This year too, Mufti Popalzai had once again divided the nation by declaring that the holy month of Ramazan will start on Friday, a day earlier than it was announced by the Central Ruet-e-Hilal Committee. The cleric said his decision was based on 9 evidences gathered by the mosque.

Hour earlier, Central Ruet-e-Hilal Committee Chairman Mufti Muneeb-ur-Rehman said at a press conference that moon was not sighted and the first day of Ramazan was observed on Saturday, April 25.

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Federal Minister for Science and Technology Fawad Chaudhry had also claimed that the experts believed Eidul Fitr to fall on May 24 in accordance with their calendar.

Fawad Chaudhry, while talking to overseas journalists, criticised the clerics once again regarding the moon sighting techniques. He said that Mufti Muneebur Rehman and Mufti Shahabuddin Popalzai are standing on different paths.

However, this time Fawad seems to be on same planet as that of Mufti Popalzai.

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However, Pakistan Meteorological Department (PMD) had predicted that Eidul Fitr, which marks the culmination of the fasting month of Ramazan, will likely to fall on May 25 (Monday).

Later, the Federal Ministry for Religious Affairs on Saturday stopped the Pakistan Meteorological Department from issuing any forecast about moon-sighting in connection with the Eidul Fitr.

The orders were passed by the Ministry of Religious Affairs, directing the Met Office that it should help the Central Ruet-i-Hilal Committee in the moon-sighting process.

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The Central Ruet-e-Hilal Committee will meet in Karachi next week on May 23 (Saturday) to sight the Shawal moon.

If the moon is sighted on Saturday, Pakistan would join the majority of Islamic World as the most of the Islamic countries are celebrating Eidul Fitr on Sunday. Traditionally, the Islamic month starts a day after Pakistan that Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries. So an Eid on Sunday is quite unlikely.


#Newsworthy…

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Ramadan Kareem: See How Many Days Remain For Eid Kabir Celebration.

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Muslim celebration is 19 today in 30 days fasting.

The first day of fasting for the holy month of Ramadan, which is determined by the sighting of the new moon, is likely to be Friday, April 24 in most Arab nations, with several still under lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Qatar, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, the United Arab Emirates and many other Muslim nations are likely to begin fasting starting Friday.

Amid the coronavirus outbreak, many activities during Ramadan are certain to be curtailed in Muslim-majority nations in the Middle East and elsewhere.

Saudi Arabia’s government said it would maintain the ban on all congregation prayers in the country, including Taraweeh – a set of special prayers that take place during the holy month.

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In the United States and Europe, Muslim communities rely on astronomical calculations and are likely to observe Ramadan from Thursday evening as well, with Friday being the first day of fasting.


Scientific predictions


Calculations by astronomers say Ramadan’s new moon will be born on April 23 at 02:27 GMT, the Qatar Calendar House (QCH) announced.

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On that day, the moon will be visible on in Central, North and South America. On April 24, the moon will be easily spotted in most parts of the world.

The actual visibility of the crescent will depend on factors such as atmospheric conditions, cloudiness and the distance between the sun and the moon on the horizon.

Muslim lunar months last between 29 and 30 days, depending on the sighting of the new moon on the 29th night of each month. If the new moon is not visible, the month lasts 30 days.

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To declare the beginning of Ramadan, Saudi Arabia and other Muslim-majority countries depend on the testimonies of local moon sighters. The Judicial High Court then decides when Ramadan begins.

Saudi Arabia’s official Umm al-Qura calendar marks the first day of fasting as April 24, 2020.

For Muslims, Ramadan is the month in which the first verses of the Quran, Islam’s holy book, were revealed to Prophet Muhammad more than 1,400 years ago.

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During the holy month, Muslims abstain from eating, drinking, smoking and sex from before dawn to sunset. The fast is intended to bring the faithful closer to God and to remind them of the suffering of the less fortunate.

Fasting during Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam, along with the Muslim declaration of faith, daily prayers, charity, and performing the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca.

In Muslim-majority countries, offices are required by law to reduce working hours, and many restaurants are closed during the daylight hours.

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However, amid the coronavirus outbreak, many workplaces, as well as most restaurants and recreational places are likely to be closed all day throughout Ramadan, in most Muslim countries and others, in an attempt to curb the spread of the virus and maintain physical distancing practices.

“Ramadan Mubarak” and “Ramadan Kareem” are common greetings exchanged in this period, wishing the recipient a blessed and generous month respectively.

Last year, fasting hours across the world ranged from 11 to 19 hours.

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At the end of Ramadan, Muslims celebrate the Eid al-Fitr holiday. Eid al-Fitr in Arabic means “festival of breaking the fast”.

Depending on the actual start date of Ramadan and the new moon sighting on the 29th night of Ramadan, Eid al-Fitr this year is likely to fall on May 24.


#Newsworthy…

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